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Panelized package cost


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W's Forum Posts: 18

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By W in Reno, NV on 12/16/2004


We'll be using a panelized package, which includes wall insulation, all roofing, interior and exterior windows and doors, sheetrock, exterior siding, and a few other incidentals (doorknobs, etc.). For a 1,732 sq ft single story, we've been given the rough estimate of it costing us $90,000. This is sounding a bit steep to me; anybody have any opinions on the cost?

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By Jeff in Henderson, NV on 12/16/2004


Sounds a little steep to me. I am in Las Vegas and am plugging your square footage into the spreadsheet I got from UBuildIt with my local prices from Oct. I got a total estimate of $60K for stick framing, roofing, drywall, stucco, and insulation.

Of course that is simply their estimate and may be WAY off. I'll know hopefully next month when I start getting bids back.

-Jeff


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By Tom in Yosemite, CA on 12/16/2004


What company is it? What type of construction?

That's lower than one package I was quoted for about 1,900 sf for $120K, but that included design and planning including long-distance travel to my site, top of the line polyurethane SIPs, high-grade Pella wood windows and doors, all interior framing lumber (sunlighthomes.com). So that's a premium package, architect-designed (actually Jon has an architecture degree, but went into building instead of doing the necessary apprenticeship to get licensed). If you want a premium, well-designed, super energy-efficient building, you should check them out.

At the other end, for a basic package from Pacific Modern Homes (pmhi.com) it's $44K for the panel package for a 1,900 sf chalet with 2x6 construction and vaulted ceilings. It's a fairly complete package compared to most panelizers. They have that particular sample plan priced out for modest finishes via HD or Lowe's and estimate total materials costs, not counting foundation and site work, at about $86K - that includes rough and finish electric and plumbing, roofing, pretty much everything except furniture and labor. They have prices for all their plans posted on their site.

So anyway, there's two panelizers at a 3:1 difference, but I don't think either one is necessarily a bad value. It's all about what you get.

Tom

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By Sybil in Leominster, MA on 12/16/2004


Are you planning on using SIPs or stick framing? The bid seems a little high to me, too.

I received bids on an 1,835 sq.ft single story, 475 sq.ft attached garage, 2x6, 16"OC, cathedrals, 8/12 roof pitch.

Allpro, which has excellent customer service, includes interior/exterior walls, roofing/shingles, insulation, exterior siding, windows/exterior doors, and came in around $30 psf. Total bid was around $70,000 including delivery from Canada.

Viceroy, which I didn't pursue, estimated $25-$30 psf, plus approximately $5,000 for panelization. Included all of the above, plus O-B consulting. They wouldn't give me an actual bid unless I paid a hefty deposit. They do offer nice incentives, such as free hardwood flooring, for signing with them.

Landmark, which is a lumber-only package, has O-B consulting and an easy construction loan program, and came in at $19 psf.

I'll be meeting with my local lumberyard on Monday, which also will panelize, to compare their bid with Landmark's.

I have found comparing panelized companies to be extremely challenging. Especially since half of them require you to use one of their plans, and the others require you to supply plans. Some use Andersen windows, and others use no-name vinyl. 

I've decided to use a lumber-only package so that I can personalize my finishes, and it's much easier to compare panelized vs. lumber, labor and construction time.


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By Tom in Yosemite, CA on 12/17/2004


Yes, comparing panelizers is extremely difficult, since they all have somewhat different packages, especially when you get into looking at SIPs. I'm going to have a local PMHI rep bring me on a tour of some homes currently under construction tomorrow. It will be my first up-close view of a panelized home. I'm expecting a lot of wasted lumber (overbuilt corners and headers). That's one of the things I worry about with regard to panelizers - they tend to use more lumber to make everything fit together and that not only wastes trees, it makes the house less efficient to heat. For example, you said:

"2x6, 16"OC"

Why do all the panelizers seem to do this? I assume it's because their nail guns are set on 16" centers and it's too hard to change or something. 

This is such a stupid waste of timber and heating fuel (because of the extra thermal bridging). If you have the option, consider going with 2x4 on 16" center and upgrading your insulation system to polyurethane foam instead of fiberglass. You will have save many trees and have better insulation (R-24 vs R-19 nominal, but much greater difference in practice because of reducing convection currents and infiltration).

Tom

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By Tom in Yosemite, CA on 12/18/2004


I toured a couple of panelized houses yesterday. One with pretty nice framing, the other less so. Both had been rained on. The one with less good framing (just not as "neat" and more cracked members) also had a cut-rate foundation that may have been the root problem.

All in all, they looked fine though. That said, I think they use more lumber than a good framer would, and that means more thermal bridges. High chance that we'll end up using the company whose houses I toured. The owners seemed quite satisfied with them

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By Dale in Richland, AZ on 7/31/2005


I am building a 2,054 sf home with a large garage that I had the framing panelized. One of the local truss companies built the walls, 2x6 @ 24" O.C. and then their crew came out and did all the framing. They built the fireplace surround, porches, arches, blocking for mechanical and plumbing, etc.

Total cost was $26K, or about $13/sf of living area. Nice part was the two weeks they cut from the construction schedule. They laid out the walls on a Thursday afternoon and were ready for an inspection on Tuesday afternoon, w/o working the weekend.


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By Baine on 8/5/2005


Dude! You HAVE to let us know who you are getting this 2,000 sq. foot home built for only $20,000 from. WHO is the panelizer? There is no way you're getting a home built for $20,000 that is 2,000 sq feet. This either has to be a typo or a joke; please share more here as you can obviously see the problem with the picture you painted. NOT to be rude, I'm actually very curious as I see home builders all over the lower-priced areas of the country building homes for $170,000 or less somehow at around 2,000 sq feet.

Thanks,

Baine


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By Dale in Richland, AZ on 8/5/2005


The $26K is my framing bill. The entire house is going to cost about $81/sf. That includes 14-SEER mechanical, granite countertops, solid maple doors on the cabinets, stained glass French doors in office, FSC front door and tile throughout.  I'll try to get some pics loaded here next week.

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By Baine on 8/5/2005


Hey Dale,

Where are you and what framing company did you use? It sounds like you didn't use an actual panelized home and it also sounds like it wasn't panelized at all, if they came out and did the framing on site. Well that doesn't sound like panelized at all; typically panelized is when all the walls and parts are built at a factory, and they just stand up the panels on site which takes 4-7 days to complete the entire shell and 10-14 days to dry in. Is this your experience?

Let us know, you didn't say a lot here. Sounds like maybe you went to a local lumberyard and said, "Hey guys, I want you to panelize my house for me." Is that what you did? We are all very very interested, as you say you got the whole house frame cost for $23,000 and that is disgustingly low :) Please share more, because that is like $60,000-$70,000 LESS than what it looks like it's going to cost me from an actual panelized home shell provider.

Baine


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By Dale in Richland, AZ on 8/5/2005


It was panelized framing. Every wall was built in a factory. Shipped to the job site and assembled. That is panelized framing. Please don't confuse this with "panel" construction like SIP's. This is strictly stick framing. They put up the walls, set the trusses, installed pocket door frames, built the fireplace surround, built the rough-sawn porches and were ready for inspection and dry-in in three working days, with a five-man crew. It was a local lumberyard/truss plant.

One thing I did that everyone using trusses should consider is called out on the framing plans mechanical chases. The guys who installed the ductwork never had it so easy.

I am based in southern Arizona. And have built before. If you want more personal info, PM me.


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By Netie in Salt Lake City, UT on 8/7/2005


Dale - Sweet!

I have to admit I hadn’t considered “panelized stick framing” although I knew about its existence. I have no experience with the process, but I assume it's pretty straightforward.

I also have little knowledge on SIP’s, but I do know they go up faster cost a bit more than “conventional stick framing” and I am not willing to pay the extra cost. We plan on rebuilding as soon as sanity will allow.

Using the panelized stick frame method seems to take less time AND cost less money ...

- sounds like an avenue I need to investigate.

Thank you.


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By Cassandra in Seymour, MO on 8/7/2005


I would like more information but do not know how to pm you?? Help? We are building in Missouri with a walkout basement and are still in the research part.
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By Baine on 8/7/2005


Dale,

You do not have your settings on here set to be able to accept p.m.s!! I would love to p.m. you find out who you used, and who did you use to make your home shell? You say it's stick-panelized homes, this is simply commonly referred to on the site as panelized homes. I have made a list of 8 panelized home builders so far. Do you know if they are selling homes to Californians like me? Give me their number and name and I will find out and post here. etc. Talk to us!!

Baine


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By Netie in Salt Lake City, UT on 8/7/2005


Actually I've see SIP's being referred as 'panelized walls/roofs' and/or 'panelized homes' quite frequently - here and on other forums.

They are Structural Insulated Panels after all... but, obviously, totally different animals.

Sometimes we read and post faster than we should, and then again some folks are just plain better at expressing themselves in writing or "chatting".

Anyway, I've done some "google'n" since I first read this thread and panelized stick framing sounds pretty darn good. I found a few places that dissed it saying "easier to hire illegals" - I say -nah, it's easier to do that if you have revolving job sites.


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By Dale in Richland, AZ on 8/7/2005


I think the problem is fixed, if not... let me know.

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By Dale in Richland, AZ on 8/7/2005


My next home project is going to be a walk-out lower level, not really a basement, as it will be all living area. The current intent is to use ICF's for below grade and SIP's for above grade. Am considering using steel girder trusses at 12' O.C. to support an SIP roof with tin can studs as ceiling support. All the interior framing is going to be light gauge steel... Between-floor framing is yet to be determined, but will be tall enough to allow all the mechanical, plumbing, and structured wiring to be easily installed.


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By Dale in Richland, AZ on 8/7/2005


There is a big difference between SIP (Structural Insulated Panels) and "panelized" wall construction.

Having used both, I prefer SIP's, although budgets may dictate one over the other. SIP's are a BETTER product. Should be quicker, almost the same price, better insulation, more airtight, more fire resistant, better building envelope and worth more on the back end.

My next project I am considering using SIP's for the exterior and "panelized' for the interior. Although, I may use light gauge steel rather than wood for the non-bearing interior walls. 


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By W in Reno, NV on 8/7/2005


We did not use panelized - the final estimate came in, for a 1,732 sq/ft single level home, at $111,000, JUST for the panelized. It did have such things as windows and doors, but this was utterly out of our price range. We are stick building presently for a fraction of the cost. And, frankly, we have *one* framer who only works half days at best and our place will be dried-in and roofed with other trades well into their jobs by the end of the month, and we just started framing on the first... not sure where panelized saves so much time. Especially when you consider that if even the slightest thing is amiss with panelized, there is no on-site fixing of the problem, it has to go through the panelized company.
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By Baine on 8/8/2005


Okay then, you need to do a much better job explaining exactly what stick panelized is. Panelized is stick built in a factory exactly like a stick built home except constructed elsewhere into panels. What are you talking about and again for the third time (not to be rude) who did you use so i can call them and get info?

baine


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By Dale in Richland, AZ on 8/8/2005


I used Holderness Supply. Located in Tucson. I can provide contact names and phone numbers if you want through email. Reason I withheld some info is that to 99% of people here it isn't relevant to the dialog. But the fact that they are a local lumber supply company and truss manufacturer capable of proving this service is, because everyone can look for a local supplier. Using Holderness is not feasible for those outside of southern AZ.

I gave them complete set of plans and they took it from there. They actually field-measured the slab before going to production.

I saw on the job site engineering plans for both the walls and the trusses. They provided crew and extra material. Some stuff like porch details and fireplace surround we made up on the job site, using sketches and an interpreter. The lead doesn't speak English too well and my Spanish is horrible. 

Does that answer ALL of your questions? 


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By Gary in Sutter Creek, CA on 8/11/2005


Dale,

Enjoyed your comments. Seems like a pretty decent price for a stick build. Are you located in N. CA? I plan on building SE of Sacramento in Amador County. So as I understand you, this was just framing, no windows, foundation, etc.?

I am building a 2,054 sf home with a large garage, that I had the framing panelized. One of the local truss companies built the walls, 2x6@ 24" o/c and then their crew came out and did all the framing. Built fireplace surround, porches, arches, blocking for mechanical and plumbing, etc.

Total cost was $26K, or about $13/sf of living area. Nice part was the two weeks they cut from the construction schedule. They laid out the walls on Thursday afternoon and were ready for an inspection on Tuesday afternoon, w/o working the weekend.


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By Mary in Prairie Village, KS on 2/22/2006


Did you ever build a panelized home? I am in KS and would like to build one. We are looking at ASBS as of right now.
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By Lori in Reno, NV on 2/22/2006


We are in the process of building a panelized home right now. Did you have any questions that I might be able to help you with?

Lori


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By Gina in Yakima, WA on 2/23/2006


Lori,

We are in Twin Falls, ID and are also going with the 'stick panelized framing'. We will probably be using a company out of Boise called Idaho Truss

My questions are:

Did you price out both regular stick frame along with the panels and how did the prices compare, if you did? (I'm impressed with the quality of the panels - no wobbly boards at all. We toured the facility and were quite impressed.)

How many framers did it take to put up the panels and how long did it take you? (Assuming you are already done.)

Gina


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By Mary in Prairie Village, KS on 2/23/2006


Yes, I would love to find out what company you used and are you happy with the process? Or if you can provide any ways to save money or what you did or didn't do that you regretted. Also, what is the square footage of the home you built and at what cost, if that isn't too rude to ask. If it isn't too weird, I would love to drive by your home and see your progress on the home or the final construction.
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By Tom in Grand Rapids, MI on 2/23/2006


We did a stick panelized in Grand Rapids with Burlingame Lumber. I think the total was about $86,000 for material and labor for 2,900 sq ft. (just the rough-in, no windows or roof). They promised 10 days, but then made no attempt to honor the 10 days. The builder told us it was a two-week job. It took them a month, more if you count the number of times they had to come back and fix stuff. Meanwhile stick framers were completing their houses in less time and doing a better job. The panels turned out okay, but the other framing was generally sloppy.

We also used the concrete stud panels for the basement. I really like them, and you can fasten drywall right to them. A thousand or two more than a conventional concrete wall, but if you had to stud out a wall, you're probably even-Steven.
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By James in Spring Branch, TX on 2/24/2006


Mary,

We are going out for bid later next week but so far the verbal estimates per sq. ft for material (SIP) and stick-framing labor-only have me looking at the energy benefits of SIP and labor cost to build and shortened schedule are making it hard to pass up.

James


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By Dale in Richland, AZ on 2/24/2006


When I did the panelized framing, I had bids from lumberyards and framers for their portion of the project. The totals were $8K-$16K more than having one company build the walls and install them.

I didn't have any scheduling or quality issues.

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By Tom in Grand Rapids, MI on 2/24/2006


I posted earlier about Burlingame Lumber. It's actually Wolohan Lumber - they changed their name awhile back. It was not so much the product we were dissatisfied with, it was the builder who roughed it in, but Wolohan made no attempt to make sure the builder had the project done in 10 days - I don't think he was even aware of the 10 days we were promised.

The vast majority of the house is still roughed-in the old fashioned way. The floors, roofing, etc. have to be done on site, and the walls are really the easiest part to build anyway. It's the putting it together that takes the time.


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By Teresa in Martinsville, VA on 3/2/2006


I believe I would shop around if someone gave me a number like that! Even with sheetrock and exterior siding, that estimate should come in about $60K-$70K. Maybe you should get a price from a framing or finish carpenter to supply the sheetrock/labor. 

Most panelized companies do not get preferred pricing on 'non-lumber' items, such as doorknobs, roof shingles, etc. They order in huge amounts of lumber, OSB or plywood, etc, but not so with siding and shingles. Those items are not usually ordered until you sign the contract for the house. 

So it would be in your best interest to price certain items yourself. Just like going to the physician and getting bad news, get a second opinion! 

Good luck!


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