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Cost of Materials to Build a House?


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By Bill in Callahan, FL on 2/4/2006


I know it will vary greatly for areas and type of building but roughly what percentage or price per ft for materials only, if you did all the labor yourself?  I have no intentions of doing all the labor by myself but I am interested in what you have to say.

Thanks,

Bill


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By Lori in Reno, NV on 2/5/2006


Hey Bill,

I can only speak about the cost of the materials for our home. We are building a 2,508 sf home and we are using a panelization program which includes trusses, cabinets, vinyl siding (including exterior trim), shingles, insulation, drywall material, doors (including garage), windows, all wood products needed for building included and all walls framed out. We are paying $42/sf for our home. This price does not include our porch areas $46 with covered porch).

Hope this helps. If you more questions don't hesitate to ask.

Lori

 


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By Mark in Ogdensburg, NJ on 2/6/2006


Bill,

I've been researching this a bit myself, and here's a couple things I've found and options I've been looking at:

1. Complete home package (non-panelized, just all the materials) from 84 Lumber: They have complete packages for as little as $19/s.f. for materials, includes everything, even sheetrock, insulation, adhesives and nails. Does not include any plumbing, electrical, or HVAC materials though.
2. Panelization packages from American Standard Building Systems, some packages as low as $25/s.f.

I am looking at all options myself, still trying to determine the best course. Good luck.

Mark


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By Randy in Dunlap, TN on 2/14/2006


Mark,

      Was that quote from 84 Lumber based on your blueprints?

Randy


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By Mark in Ogdensburg, NJ on 2/14/2006


Randy,
It wasn't from my plans, but from a set of their plans online that I liked, in their "Affordable" section of their website. It seems that if there's a stock plan you like, their price is quite good.

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By Robert in San Ramon, CA on 5/19/2006


Lori,

We are building a similar size home (2,504) using a panelization package (abshomes.com). Our initial price is $35 sq ft not including the cabinets or drywall.

1. What company are you using for your package?

2. Do you have a detailed budget with total cost per square foot?

(We are just at the interview the contractors stage.)

Robert


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By Lori in Reno, NV on 5/20/2006


Hello Robert and welcome to The Owner-Builder Book website.

1.      The company we are using is Instant Home Equity, IHEonline.com the west coast contact is Art Cline (I can get his number if you have any questions you want to ask him). I did a lot of checking around before we decided which company to go with. There are several homes in our area done through IHE. We also liked the fact that they worked with a designer licensed in Nevada for two reasons. One, we did not have to use IHE’s plans (they do not have big enough one-story homes) the designer drew just what we wanted. Two, we did not have to have the plans re-engineered since the architect held a Nevada license. This saved us about $4,000 (the cost our friend paid for the engineering of her plans).

2.      Yes, we have a total budget. Along with all the normal items, we have costs for well, septic, and pulling electricity to the property. The budget is $262,000, which did not please the bank, because it is low when compared to the estimated appraised value, (close to  $600,000). So far, we are doing pretty well at staying within the budget. It has been a give and take from one job to the next.

Hope this helps. If you have any other questions or want to call Art let me know.

Lori


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By Robert in San Ramon, CA on 5/21/2006


Lori,

Thanks for the info. Any chance I can twist your arm and have you post your detailed budget/time line on the forum? I will post mine for everyone once I have it complete (30 days or so).


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By Lori in Reno, NV on 5/21/2006


Robert,

The below attachment is our "sworn construction statement". It is Excel, hopefully you can open it.

When we requested the loan, we asked for $262,000. MidCountry Bank was leery to loan us that LITTLE of an amount and asked IHE to write our loan amount for $302,500 as you can see in the sworn statement.

So the IHE rep called to ask where we wanted the extra money put. I told her I didn’t care since we had no plans on using it. Since then I have learned about front-loading a loan. In hindsight I would have done that with the extra money.

I will put the time line on this week. Hope this helps.

Lori


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By Tiffany in Conway, AR on 5/24/2006


I am having the same issue with the banks where I've applied for an owner-builder loan. My house is approx. 4,700 SF (heated and cooled, 5,500 SF including garage). It should appraise for $400K. I put together my estimate based on pricing from a friend of mine who does various work through the industry. The total came out to about $46/sf. However, I asked the bank for $255,000. They are balking because they say that I "...can't POSSIBLY build this house for $46/SF!"

Should I go back and raise my costs so they "look" in line with what the bank expects to see?


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By Jeff in Provo, UT on 5/24/2006


If you can, I would go ahead and raise the amounts that you have specified for each of the trades a little. Banks don't want to end up with a half-finished house that they have to deal with, so they would rather have more money in the loan than less - plus then they get more interest and fees -- win/win for the banks!  ;-) 

Chances are you will go over budget somewhere anyway -- I went about 20% over... If you put the extra money into the first trades, you can often use it later to cover anything that might happen. But, be sure to check with your bank.


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By Lori in Reno, NV on 5/24/2006


Tiffany,

When you put the numbers together for the loan did you get actual bids for the jobs you are subbing out? If no plans to use subs did you get today's prices for materials being used in the house, e.g. tile, carpet, siding, nails, glue, and grout from supply houses?

It is very important that you get bids from the guys in each trade. If your friend doesn't actively work in each trade, he will not have firsthand knowledge of the current price of materials, and therefore your pricing may be off.

If you have done all this then, yes, I would go back to the bank with a number that pleases them. I really didn't want to change my loan amount, but it got us our loan. I wish you luck and if you need any other help feel free to ask.

Lori


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By P in North, FL on 5/24/2006


Hi Lori,

Does your $262,000 include the land?


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By Lori in Reno, NV on 5/25/2006


Phil,

No, we owned the land before we started the building process. We bought the land right before the market went wild on land here in the Reno area. We have 11.5 acres and the 10-acre parcels are going for $180,000 so you could say we are very fortunate.

Lori


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By P in North, FL on 5/25/2006


That is great that you got in before stuff went crazy. We own our land too, but we lucked out. Land prices have jumped again around here and it is crazy.
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By Robert in San Ramon, CA on 5/27/2006


Forum,

Did anyone else have to pay high loan costs to get an owner-builder loan? Our initial approved loan came with 3.5 points attached! I have been researching the Net and it looks like two points are common. I was hoping for one point or less!

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Robert


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By Lori in Reno, NV on 5/27/2006


Robert,

Have you closed your building loan yet?

Lori


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By Lori in Reno, NV on 6/20/2006


Robert,

Sorry it took me so long to get the timeline on. Hope this helps.

 


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By Randy in Dunlap, TN on 6/21/2006


Lori,

     What is the staus of your build and are you on budget?

Randy


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By Lori in Reno, NV on 6/21/2006


Randy,

Our walls and flooring are arriving this Sunday. My husband is hoping to lay the floor joists Sunday/Monday. We will see how it goes.

We are below budget at this time, but we don't have power yet and expect when we do we will be back at budget, since the actual price appears to be coming in above bid price (something to do with the placement of a pole).

I am hoping there are a few more corners we will be able to cut, but we will just have to wait and see.

Lori


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By Randy in Dunlap, TN on 6/21/2006


Lori,

    Many thanks, best wishes.

Randy


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By Ben in Galloway Township, NJ on 9/10/2007


Robert,  I saw your message from some time ago. Did you build the house you were thinking of? I am wondering if you could post your budget. I am collecting pricing information right now for my own house and am trying to compare notes with other owner-builders.

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By Mark in Seattle, WA on 9/20/2007


Bill,

Every O-B should have a copy of the Means Cost Estimator. It's a book used by contractors to bid on construction. I'm surprised that the bookstore here doesn't have it. It's available at most big home hardware stores that have a book section.

When you ask a contractor to build you a house and give him your plans, he looks in Means and comes up with material and labor costs. You can do the same thing for the whole house, for the foundation work, for a bathroom, whatever. The book even has multipliers for different areas of the country. You shouldn't send out bid requests without going to Means first. It breaks down construction costs into incredible detail.

There are similar reference materials for ground work and concrete work. I used an online calculator before requesting my concrete bids. The bid I chose was within a few dollars of the online calculation. He may have even used the same calculator. The calculator gives you price per sf/thickness.  When the wall is over a certain height, it adds in scaffolding costs. Extra rebar? It can be calculated in. Slab penetrations? It calculates costs per.

Reference materials also give you a way to catch mistakes. Twice I received bids that were way off from my estimate by suspicious amounts. Both times, I got the sub to talk a little about the bid and realized that we weren't on the same page for some reason. They had misunderstood some element of the plan, misunderstood the scope of the work, misunderstood the materials I was providing, or simply miscalculated. It saved me at least $4,000 by buying a $30 book. If a sub overbids by $2,000, you won't hear anything about it when he realizes that the project is simpler that he thought.

In addition, you'll get better bids. My experience was that subs quote a higher price when you say "how much to do this?" as opposed to "what's your charge per square foot not including materials?" The more you understand their business, the more likely they will look closely at their bid.

Moderate Mark


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By Larry in Larue, TX on 9/24/2007


Tiffany,

What did you end with as to your budget or your amount per square foot?  Thanks.


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By Mary Beth in Dublin, OH on 10/2/2007


Mark,

Am I right to assume that in order to use this Means book you would have to have a pretty hefty knowledge of the whole building process and building materials? I wouldn't know rebar from an iron bar.... ( well, maybe... but that was my first initial thought!) I read all of the posts on this forum and it is beginning to make me think that I will never know enough about building to ever completely understand it all and talk and think like I pro.

I went into this project thinking that I know I can manage time and people. I definitely don't know how to actually build a house. Can people actually take on this project without having to become a professional builder? I don't want to get hosed everytime I turn around because I am taken advantage of because A. I'm a woman and B. I don't 100% speak the lingo. I can investigate the subs till the cows come home, but even they can turn out to be something that was not represented to me. Oh my... I am starting to think I'm spitting in the wind!

Mary Beth


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By Kenneth in Lees Summit, MO on 10/2/2007


The RS Means manual is as simple, yet as complex as you want it to be. I would stick with the RS Means Residential Cost Data Book, your library should have a current copy (it will probably be behind the counter, $120/copy is kind of pricey for your personal library if you intend to do this only once). Study it and you will understand the usefulness as a planning and estimating tool. You will also understand factors that increase your price, upgrades and what they cost, and a whole host of other factors that relate to costs and estimating, along with planning and design and how this impacts cost and estimating. RS Means has many other books not related to residential construction.
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By Mark in Seattle, WA on 10/3/2007


Mary Beth,

The Means Cost Data (MCD) book shows up used on eBay for about $15-$20. It's a yearly publication, and if you're a contractor, it's important to keep current. If you're an O-B, it's more important to know how to break down the cost of construction and get rough estimates. Sometimes there are huge jumps in material costs (copper plumbing pipe comes to mind). Most years, a general inflation number is good enough to understand what your costs will be (or should be). 

Just a read through the book will help you understand construction costs.  For instance, kitchen-cabinet costs are broken down by grade. If you choose grade B, MCD will give you a price per lineal foot by material, labor, and total. It will also list "upgrades," such as countertop materials. A contractor doesn't think in terms of maple, oak, cherry, stain color, etc. It's just price per lineal foot, availability, installation difficulty. A book like MCD will help you see it the same way. 

A woman goes on to the car lot and the salesman asks "what color car are you interested in?" If the woman answers "red" (or any other color), he can safely assume that she is not a sophisticated car buyer. The correct answer is "I don't give a &*?@ about the color." If your contractor asks you about your choice of carpet color, ask him if he intends to screw and glue the subfloor. That's the type of information that MCD can give you.

You don't have to speak all the lingo. A little goes a long way.

Moderate Mark


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By Mary Beth in Dublin, OH on 10/4/2007


Thanks, Mark. I'll give eBay or Amazon a try. I checked our library and they consider it a periodical and will not lend them out. I started making sub calls today and I always get nervous they are going to ask me these really highly technical questions and I am going to be left wagging my tongue. I called the county engineers' office, too, to find out where I should start. We do not currently own the land although the land/parcel is what we have based our home plans on. Because the land needs quite a bit of site developing (900' driveway, septic, well, etc...) I want to make sure my budget doesn't get busted just on that part alone.

Mary Beth


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By Mark in Seattle, WA on 10/12/2007


Mary Beth,

Land preparation costs are something that most don't talk about. Seems that flat land, easy access, existing utilities, etc., are the norm. Because of my steep grade, I had a $20K excavation bill and a $20K foundation bill for a 625-sf garage with a shop above. I have a sewage-ejector pump in a below-grade tank, 200 feet of pipe to the septic tank, and several hundred feet in buried electrical supply line (after paying $800 to the utility to move the transformer). Add in a $1,200 permit, a $3,500 survey, and a $3,000 geotech report. Most cost estimates would be about $60K for the entire building. I'd spent that before I pounded the first nail. 

Moderate Mark


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By Mary Beth in Dublin, OH on 10/13/2007


You're scaring me,Mark! That's the kind of expenses that often are neglected in the initial budgeting of a project. Because I am not a contractor I am not familiar with all the technical costs that are part of each stage. We want to write an offer for the land but want to have a fairly large walk out clause if we find that the costs in developing the site become prohibitive. I suppose, first, we have to have an idea of how "prohibitive" will be defined. This land is fairly flat with a gradual grade from road frontage to where the house would sit. The soil isn't the greatest where the house would be and that would require a lot of piping and pumping to get the septic waste to the back of the property. I'm really anxious to get some hard numbers, but I can't unless we are in contract. I don't want to write an insulting offer to the owner, but on the other hand I know that it will cost a lot to develop this property and I want to cover myself, too. I fear I will offer a price that he will deem too low and will counter with full price and I will be stuck as I cannot afford his full price. This is the chess move that I am having a hard time deciding on!

Thanks again,

Mary Beth


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By Bob in New Florence, PA on 10/16/2007


Mary Beth,

I'm not knocking you, but make sure you really plan this out. Judging by your posts, it almost sounds as if you're intimidated by this and you cannot let yourself become like that. If you are, you need to harden up fast. Me and my wife are about 75% of the way through our owner-builder project and she was the same way, now after three months she is ready to fire everyone at the drop of a hat.

You're in Dublin and you are near Columbus, so you have a goldmine out there. It's called Amish; these guys are some of the best tradesmen you'll find, and they are cheap to boot. I would suggest you find them and it won't take long for them to direct you to who the premiere builders are in the area and they will be more than happy to help you. We had Amish framers and they were great and no one's prices could even come close. You can also talk to some GC's in your area and maybe have one act as a consultant to you for a few hundred bucks.

Honestly, follow The Owner-Builder Book. Interview a bunch of subs, get bids, get references, get pictures of past jobs and hire ones you feel you can trust that people speak highly of. Believe it or not, your contractors for the most part will all know of each other and they will tell you who to hire and who to stay away from.

Do not be intimidated. My wife has grabbed this by the horns and she has rocked. I was the typical man who told her she couldn't do it and she has proved me wrong. She has basically organized our whole project. There are a lot of great people on this site and you can use them to your benefit... But believe in yourself and it will happen. Talk to some Realtors and ask them for averages of similar types of properties in your area. This will give you an idea, a starting point if you will as to where you should start with your offer. But remember like us - we paid a little extra, but it was where we wanted to be so it was worth it to us. So try it and see what happens.


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By Mary Beth in Dublin, OH on 10/17/2007


Bob,

Thanks for the "Lectric Shave" slap!!! LOL! I'm sure I needed a good dose of that. I would have to admit after interviewing 6 different builders and having them tell me that I am way too ambitious to take on this large of a project myself, it has shaken my moorings a bit. All the builders but one gave me their cost and expenditure disclosures. None came in on budget. So... I'm feeling a bit defeated after I have spent so much time on this project - not to mention the money I would be out to the architect...

You sound like you know our area well! Not many others know that we live on the edge of a large Amish population. Actually, the land we want to buy is in Plain City (but still Dublin schools).  I know that there are Amish framers and carpenters around. The guy who trimmed out my current house was (Yoder). However, the builders I have talked to recently do not want to reveal any of their tradespeople - unless, of course, I were to use them. Maybe I should hang out in the local coffee shops more! I've talked to the take-off guy at Carter Lumber, but he only wanted to give me the names of the people that they use and only if I use their materials. I have talked to many contractors. Must be talking to the wrong ones!! None of them have expressed any interest in wanting to be a consultant. It seems like they see it as something they can't quite grasp what their actual role would be and can't imagine how they would charge for it and what their job description would be.

There are days I feel like I can completely take this on and others I just want to bag it. The fixed fees that the builders are charging are running around $75K - (on a $900K+ house/land total project) but they are still holding the liabilities. I would be in on all decisions and can bid and sub anyone I would choose. They would manage the subs for me and keep me on track and budget. In some ways it sounds like a wise move, as I can imagine that I could easily make a $75K mistake.

Just a lot to think about. I really like reading how everyone has done this and are currently doing it. It is inspiring. I am in the throes of all my legwork right now, and it just doesn't seem to be producing the hopeful result that I wanted and that has me a bit down.

Thanks again!

Mary Beth


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By Bob in New Florence, PA on 10/24/2007


You may be better served going with a GC or stick builder maybe a Wayne Homes, Hovnanian or whoever is in that area you can get a decent house at a decent price. In my opinion, you get far more bang for your buck doing it yourself and subbing the trades, but it is not for everyone.

My job is flexible and my wife is laid off right now, and honestly I could not imagine doing this if I couldn't be on the site almost everyday. I am the type who wants to see everything and I want everything to be the way I want it and I could not be hands off.

Me and my wife split everything. She makes the calls to inspector, the subs, etc... I give them a boot in the butt when they need it and I handle the manual labor when it needs to be done, along with my father-in-law. We try and do as much as we can to cut costs on basic things. There are some things that we just won't do, like masonry, electrical, and plumbing, but there was a lot of the framing, painting, and clearing stuff that we did and you get the sweat equity without blowing your budget. I am about to start drywall, so it's nitty gritty time. Every penny we save now helps, and we can add some of the higher-end features that we wanted but had to wait to see what the numbers were. We added hardwood over carpet in the living room and hallway now, since we saved a bunch on our tile sub. We saved a bunch on doors due to the material supplier's errors, so we had the Amish build us a shed, etc...

Bottom line is Mary Beth, only you know what you can do and what you cannot do. My advice would be do what you can and stick to your strengths; don't be afraid to do this, but don't bite off more than you can chew. But you have to have good subs, and in all honesty as my inspector said "If you have good subs the house will basically build itself."


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By Kenneth in Lees Summit, MO on 10/24/2007


I am going to tend to agree with Bob here. You learn to crawl before you learn to walk, and you get pretty proficient at walking before you decide you want to train for the Boston Marathon. A $900K build job is a pretty substantial build job for a first O-B. I know I learned a lot simply by working on Habitat for Humanity house, and then undertaking my O-B I learned a tremendous amount, and yet I am not certain that I would undertake a build job like that without professional help.

OTOH, if you are extremely organized you could get it done. For this project, I would try to find a retired code inspector (preferably on the commercial side of the house) or someone else retired out of the construction management field to be your mentor and lead you through the construction details and aspects of the job, and then leave you to manage the rest of the details. I would use this person to screen subcontractors, screen suppliers, be my eyes and ears on-site, etc.

If you are going to do that, why not just hire a GC? Good question. I tend to think that GCs are not truly working for you, they are working for themselves, and no one cares about your house the way you do. The GC has shiny new trucks, nice new tools, nice office space, retirement for themselves and their employees, insurance, etc. so they bring a pretty large burden rate into the equation (that a retired person might not bring). Also a GC isn't terribly interested in saving you money, nor do they even like knowledgeable clients that might make them do things the right way instead of the way they have always done things. You can cover a lot of flaws with sheetrock and finish materials. I have met some good GCs, one I would even consider hiring to build a house for me, but ultimately even he wouldn't care as much as I would and he still leaves a lot to be desired as to needing oversight.

Ultimately you need to have good subcontractors. There are a lot of good ones out there, but they are not terribly easy to find. The good ones stay busy with no advertising, digging them up for a first time O-B might be a challenge. OTOH there are a lot of unscrupulous subcontractors that would like nothing better than to take advantage of a relatively naive O-B in way over their head - ca-ching...


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By Roger in Petoskey, MI on 10/24/2007


Mary Beth, I'd like to offer a little support. I'm in the final phase of my first owner-builder project. It is fairly expensive for a first try ($750K), but it is "do-able". I'm pretty organized, and I have been fortunate to get referrals to good subs (at a time when the building business is hurting here). I've also found I'm at the site daily (sometimes 3X/day). 

In my opinion, the most important factor after being organized is money. If you have no room to wiggle with the $900K budget, you may be in a world of trouble. Most small problems and miscalculations seem to fix themselves if you're able to pay for them. 

Roger


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By Ben in Galloway Township, NJ on 10/24/2007


There are books like that available in electronic format. I just bought one for about $30. This manual is from Craftsman, if I am not mistaken. There are adjustment factors based on your location. In my case for example, I am in New Jersey in the Atlantic City area, and adjustment factors are available for labor, materials, and equipment.

The big question I have is about what is a realistic "street" value/estimate. For a budget proposal would you go with these estimates, or is it realistic to assume that you can find things cheaper by shopping around? The sweat equity is easy enough to calculate, but if you are looking at framing of internal walls, you may be able to shop around and find materials for less than the "book" value. So, what do you use as a guideline or do you first send out bid requests before you go to your lender with a budget?

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By Mark in Seattle, WA on 10/24/2007


The "street value" of materials has all changed with the Internet, assuming you have the time and inclination to look there. My electrical panel was a special order, $400 at the local electrical supply house. I got it for $140 with the main breaker on eBay. Same 60% off with a demand water heater, a whole-house ventilation system, etc. I have heard that some of this stuff may actually be stolen from building sites, but most of my sellers seemed legitimate, had more that one item for sale, and good feedback.

I kept track of my expenses on an Excel spreadsheet, including tools purchased, permits, cash payments to subs, etc. One of the things I did was put down the cost of eBay, recycled, or Craigslist items with another column on "normal" costs (i.e., Home Depot) for the same item. I'm doing the finish trim right now, and haven't added up the receipts for awhile. I understand why O-B blogs tend to fizzle out at this stage. Still, it will be interesting to calculate my "house that eBay built" construction.

This was all owner-financed, so I didn't have to predict my expenses and beg a lender. That changes a lot of things. I simply guesstimated that I could do it for under $100 sf for a really nice studio/garage below, including some complex land preparation. One column on my spreadsheet was for my guesstimated costs (from RS Means and window shopping) and the goal was to stay under those figures. I'm at about $85 sf with only kitchen cabinets and appliances to go. Vinyl floor ($380 on sale at Lowe's) went in this weekend.

Beth: Nothing wrong with being scared. In fact, you should be scared. If you're not, you're not being realistic.

Moderate Mark


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By John in Lake City, FL on 10/31/2007


Mark, I agree with you. When my wife and I did our first O-B project, we were scared ourselves. I worked in the construction industry for a few years and had seen what materials and labor costs would be. However; I wanted the final control over the project. We went through the process with some headaches, but the end product and savings were tremendous. Keep in mind, there is always someone out ho will do it cheaper, but not always better. That is where oversight comes into play. The second O-B project, our feeling went from scared to concerned. We finished that project up in a lot longer, but we had to deal with three hurricanes in one year. The project turned out very nicely.

Now, we are attempting our third O-B project and we are back to the scared phase. The reason is that we moved to another area of the state and do not know people. However; I keep reminding myself that good subs will support other good subs. In addition, I have seen OSB drop from $10 sheet to under $5. Other things are starting to drop since the market is essentially dead here in Florida. I think that "street value" of materials are coming down on some things and others are the same or higher.

I pulled my construction cost on my first O-B project and I was amazed that when you add everything up, it is about what it is now. It is hard to believe, but as they say, numbers don't lie. As for our second O-B project, materials were higher, but the building boom in Florida was going on. One lesson I learned is that if you can specify all the variables ("type of fixture - American Standard toilet/elongated bowl/model name - $229") you have a better chance of staying on budget.

Another lesson I learned is that all the "nickel and dime" stuff adds up quickly if you don't budget for it. I spent close to $1,000 for tapcons that I did not figure on spending. Therefore; on our next project, I am going to add a line item in my Excel spreadsheet - "nickel, dime, quarter." I am going to allow a 5% cost for this. If in the end you have it, great, if not, you should have it budgeted for. I just wanted to share my experience.

John


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By Joseph on 3/7/2017




Concrete Model MT-360

It is a mechanical equipment; Made of high strength steel, consisting of a drum with blades installed inside it, mounted on an axis with adjustable conical rollers, with 360 ° horizontal rotation assembled to another mechanism for 360 ° vertical tilt. The power of the motor is transmitted to the drum by means of pulleys and V-belts. This allows the drum to be turned constantly over time in order to mix inert materials such as minced stone, sand, cement and water to achieve the mixture Of desired concrete.


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By Centrum CI Inc in Brighton, AL on 8/10/2017


If you already own the lot. You have to think first how big your house will be. Get the exact metrics measurements, the equipment you will use. Now check the current market price of those things you need then you will have to calculate what your budget can get. Or better hire a professional to at least do a planning. 
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By Alex in Falls Church, VA on 2/6/2019


Firstly i want to share its also depends on budget.What we spent.
 
But here i mention some info as example :

However, homeowners report the average cost to build a new house comes in at 
$290,035, which would put a 2,000 square foot home costing about $150 per square foot. This will obviously vary greatly with all the costly variables involved, so the cost could range between $147,939 and $432,863.
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